SOMEWHERE BETWEEN: Disco Donkey on Fire & Do Donkeys Bleed Blue Blood in Space. 2010  
 
Slide 1

 

Styrofoam, plaster, epoxy resin, fluorescent lights and Karl Marx's severed Head.

1200 x 900 x 2100mmm (LxWxH)

 

 

 

Slide 1

 

Styrofoam, plaster, epoxy resin, fluorescent lights and Karl Marx's severed Head.

1200 x 900 x 2100mmm (LxWxH)

 
MEANINGS MEDIUM: THE GOLDEN YEARS OF THE FUTURE

 

Walter Benjamin's (1892 -1940) dissertation The Origin of German Tragic Drama developed an aesthetic theory of the allegorical. Benjamin's allegorical idea spoke of 'the non-being of what it represents'. His concept was,

 

… associated with the image of the rubbled landscape, of transfixed unrest, is characterised by the ambiguity of being, by the contrarieties that can articulate the antithetical tension between construction and destruction, between reality and fiction, between appearance and being, between hope and disappointment. (Muller 2007 p166)

 

The influence of Benjamin's allegorical zone through modernism into the post-modern psyche is confounding. I would suggest that the reason for this is that Benjamin's allegory is rooted in the history of tragedy, which is inseparable from any attempt to construct a grand theory of periodization. The Postmodern psyche's obsession with the pending collapse of the world order; be it environmental or political, our spiritual and ideological ambivalence and the death of meaning and value all point to a time that echo's Benjamin's deconstruction of the Baroque. Rather, Benjamin's Baroque period represents the height of civilizations' achievements as it tinkers on the edge of its own historical and or actual annulation. The Baroque's tragedy is that it seeks Schizophrenic Teleology's final purpose but ends its eschatological quest in an equilibrium state lost between creation and destruction. This situational stalemate breaks the entrenched logic of societies structural boundaries, which are used to construct the safe and reliable Schizophrenic Teleology of the day. In breaking the very matrix of meaning; short-circuiting the very binary relations that construct our worldview we are thrown into the terrifying potential and truth of ambiguity.

 

What do we mean when we say that boundaries and relations are things? Are not the water's edge and the land's end one and the same? Is the shoreline a part of the land or of the sea, or is it a line in its own right? It is easy to see that you cannot have a shoreline without a sea, a little harder to see that you cannot have a sea without a shore, and downright difficult for most of us to see that you can't have either without a shoreline. A person must draw that line somewhere. Wherever there is a sea, somebody must say to the water, so far you go and no farther; and to the land he must say, this is the end of you. And the relation between the one and the other is the act of delineation that went on in his head. The world is really a dynamic operation; only by means of symbols can the mind deal with it "as if" it were a static structure. (Upton 1961 p31)

 

Slide 1

 

Styrofoam, plaster, epoxy resin, fluorescent lights and Karl Marx's severed Head.

1200 x 900 x 2100mmm (LxWxH)